Liquidating the family home – Part II

June 2024

Michelle Knows Antiques

Liquidating the family home – Part II

by Michelle Staley

Many of you have already experienced the task of deciding what to do with the contents of the family home or at least the home in which your parents lived for many decades. Some of you have yet to find yourself sitting in the home office staring into the abyss of a closet overflowing with miscellany of operating two business out of the home, three printers, a scanner, Costco-sized bundles of ledger books, and stacks of items so deep that you can’t see the back wall.

My father is 91 and still living in the house they purchased when we moved to Kansas in 1985. It has four levels, four bedrooms each with extra large closets, eight additional closets, and a darkroom in the basement which has been used for storage. I have learned that closets are capable of hiding all types of goodies that should have been donated decades ago. He is wanting to move out of the big house and will be moving in with me or my oldest daughter hopefully this summer.

Mom was an antique collector and dealer. Due to daddy’s job we had the privilege of living or visiting locations around the world, and it was not unusual for mom to have a wood crate or large boxes of purchases shipped back to the U.S. It was a huge thrill when the transport truck would deliver a large wood crate. They had to place it in the front yard where we would dismantle the crate, toss excelsior all over the yard until the beautiful items inside were revealed. Think about the movie “A Christmas Story” when the leg lamp was delivered, that was us.

Needless to say, though the house is neat and tidy, it is filled to capacity with stuff. One helpful and important thing that mama did over the years was place little notes with items she felt that we needed to know the provenance or history. For instance, she has a child’s roll top desk and chair. One day while dusting I came across one such note. It told the story about seeing the pieces in a shop window and how she stopped to look at them. My granny noticed mom’s interest and months later on her birthday she presented the desk and chair to my mama. The chair is a child’s Windsor back chair. This poses a big quandary for myself and my daughters as none of us really have the space to bring the desk and chair home, but it apparently had significant meaning for my mama. Do we keep it or sell it?

Since my daddy could use the money, we have decided to sell these two pieces. The desk should sell for $250 and the chair around $100.

My family doesn’t have many heirloom pieces but the few that we do have will come to my house or the home of my oldest. We both have glassed-in cabinets in which to place them. They have a 1950s or 1960s Brunswick three-piece slate top pool table with cushion bumpers. It will include all accessories, The two family members who want it haven’t thought things through. One is living in my basement and the other in an apartment in Chicago. This has a resale value of around $3,000 but my price is half of that and I drew the short straw on who is going to inform these two that a full sized pool table just isn’t going to work with their living space.

A Lambert push plow. (Image courtesy of the author)

Child's Roll Top Desk

This 1920s child’s rolltop desk was passed down in the family but doesn’t have sentimental value, so it will be sold, along with many other items collected over the years by the author’s parents. (Image courtesy of the author)

A Lambert push plow. (Image courtesy of the author)

Child's Roll Top Desk

Inside of 1920s child’s rolltop desk. (Image courtesy of the author)

 

 

One thing that I have found to be very important is to let your parent(s) assist in the sorting process, to a certain extent. Daddy is struggling with severe dementia and is afraid that we are just going to throw everything in the trash. So we are letting him go through certain rooms and pick what he wants moved with him. Many years ago I conducted an estate sale for a neighbor who also suffered from dementia. I allowed her to help with the sorting process but when the sale started she would literally chase people down the driveway who had made a purchase. Needless to say, I had to call a family member to come get her.

This is a time consuming, overwhelming, and at times emotional process. I have found that you have to distance yourself from the sentiment, and let common sense run the show. There are so many items you would love to have because of the emotional attachment, but the reality is, none of us need all of the stuff, and the goal is to make some money for your parents or the estate. This is hard for anyone to do. But don’t just go throwing items away thinking that they might be junk because they might have monetary value. A box of onion skin typing paper, $35.

 These are the walls that get in your way when liquidating the family home. There are some options if you don’t feel comfortable holding a living estate sale yourself. You can hire an estate sale company to do it for you or if you have plentiful high dollar items you can go with a reputable auction company. Both of these come with caveats, such as most estate sale companies will not touch small estates and have a minimum dollar amount so you may not make any money. Auctions are a crap shoot. The auctioneer must have a large list of regular customers because without a crowd your items will sell for pennies on the dollar. Most importantly, get references and check them. You will find many estate sale companies that really don’t keep up with prices and selling trends. This is great for the consumer but not for you, the seller. My family is fortunate because I can do the sale and get the best price. I also know what will sell better online than at an estate sale. Mom collected elephants and paperweights. While most have little value there are some that are quite costly and I will sell them online.

Remember that at an estate sale you can ask a bit more for the items than a garage sale, but you don’t want to price yourself at full retail. Cater to dealers especially if you have furniture.

I hope this has given you a bit of guidance so that you don’t find yourself sitting in a chair staring into a closet filled to capacity. One last little piece, don’t get overwhelmed. I started this process in November and have gone through two rooms. Ask for help.
If you want to be notified when I finally have the sale please send me an email.

*All prices given are for sale in a private sale, antique shop, or other resale outlets. Price is also dependent upon the geographic area in which you are selling. Auction value, selling to a dealer or pawn shop prices are about ½ or less of resale value.

Michelle Staley is a Lenexa, KS-based dealer and researcher with 35 years of experience in the antique trade.

Send questions with photos to Michelle at michelle@discovervintage.com or TXSmichelle@gmail.com. Please keep queries to one question; questions without photos of the item may not be answered. There is no guarantee that your question will be answered or published.

Michelle is also available for consulting and extensive research work beyond this column. If you would like an appraisal on an antique or collectible please go to www.michellesantiqueappraisals.com for a one-on-one appraisal. Please note new web address.

 

Liquidating the family home, Part I

April 2024

Michelle Knows Antiques

Liquidating the family home, Part I

by Michelle Staley

Many of you have already experienced the task of deciding what to do with the contents of the family home or at least the home in which your parents lived for many decades. Some of you have yet to find yourself sitting in the home office staring into the abyss of a closet overflowing with miscellany of operating two business out of the home, three printers, a scanner, Costco-sized bundles of ledger books, and stacks of items so deep that you can’t see the back wall.

My father is 91 and still living in the house they purchased when we moved to Kansas in 1985. It has four levels, four bedrooms each with extra-large closets, eight additional closets, and a darkroom in the basement which has been used for storage. I have learned that closets are capable of hiding all types of goodies that should have been donated decades ago. He is wanting to move out of the big house and will be moving in with me or my oldest daughter hopefully this summer.

Mom was an antique collector and dealer. Due to daddy’s job, we had the privilege of living or visiting locations around the world, and it was not unusual for mom to have a wood crate or large boxes of purchases shipped back to the U.S. It was a huge thrill when the transport truck would deliver a large wood crate. They had to place it in the front yard, where we would dismantle the crate and toss excelsior all over the yard until the beautiful items inside were revealed. Think about the movie “A Christmas Story” when the leg lamp was delivered; that was us.

Needless to say, though the house is neat and tidy, it is filled to capacity with stuff. One helpful and important thing that mama did over the years was place little notes with items she felt that we needed to know the provenance or history. For instance, she has a child’s roll top desk and chair, and one day while dusting I came across one such note. It told the story about seeing the pieces in a shop window and stopped to look at them. My granny noticed mom’s interest and months later on her birthday she presented the desk and chair to my mama. The chair is a child’s Windsor back chair. This poses a big quandary for myself and my daughters as none of us really have the space to bring the desk and chair home, but it apparently had significant meaning for my mama. Do we keep it or sell it?

Since my daddy could use the money, we have decided to sell these two pieces. The desk should sell for $250 and the chair around $100.

My family doesn’t have many heirloom pieces, but the few we do have will come to my house or the home of my oldest. We both have glassed-in cabinets in which to place them. They have a 1950s or 1960s Brunswick three-piece slate top pool table with cushion bumpers. It will include all accessories. The two family members who want it haven’t thought things through. One is living in my basement and the other in an apartment in Chicago. This has a resale value of around $3,000, but my price is half of that and I drew the short straw on who is going to inform these two that a full -sized pool table just isn’t going to work with their living space.
More on whether to keep or sell those heirlooms in next month’s issue!

A Lambert push plow. (Image courtesy of the author)

Roll Top Desk

This roll top desk is only one of many items that has a story to tell in my parents’ home. (Image courtesy of the author)

*All prices given are for sale in a private sale, antique shop, or other resale outlets. Price is also dependent upon the geographic area in which you are selling. Auction value, selling to a dealer or pawn shop prices are about ½ or less of resale value.

Michelle Staley is a Lenexa, KS-based dealer and researcher with 35 years of experience in the antique trade.

Send questions with photos to Michelle at michelle@discovervintage.com or TXSmichelle@gmail.com. Please keep queries to one question; questions without photos of the item may not be answered. There is no guarantee that your question will be answered or published.

Michelle is also available for consulting and extensive research work beyond this column. If you would like an appraisal on an antique or collectible please go to www.michellesantiqueappraisals.com for a one-on-one appraisal. Please note new web address.

 

Unusual things that people collect includes UNO cards

March 2024

Michelle Knows Antiques

Unusual things that people collect includes UNO cards

by Michelle Staley

Greetings, all. I hope this finds you healthy and warm.
By nature I am a very curious person. If there is a box sitting by the side of the road, I’m going to stop and open it to discover what’s inside. Believe me, I have regretted this decision on more than one occasion but continue to do it.

The ability to start a conversation with anyone has served me well over the years. This has led me to meeting some really great people with interesting stories to tell. One such incident recently occurred while in Austin. I started chatting with a young woman sitting near me. We talked about the icy cold weather in Texas, the amazing antique table lamps in the bar, and quickly the conversation turned to what people collect.

She collects UNO cards — yep, the 100-plus-cards-to-a-pack, colorful card game. I have heard of people collecting playing cards and have seen some beautiful antique cards. There are role playing cards such as Magic the Gathering cards that came out in the 1990s, some of which can be worth in the upper five figures, especially if they are from the first edition. Somewhere in my house is a shoebox full of these cards that our youngest daughter just had to have. I put them away for safe keeping and have yet to find the silly box.

The UNO card game was invented in 1971 by Merle Robbins. It was later taken over by Mattel. It is estimated that there are more than 640 variations on the cards and a number of spinoffs.

Her UNO card collection really intrigued me as I was unaware that there were even different styles of UNO cards. She just happened to have photographs on her phone, and I was blown away by the her collection. My favorite UNO cards in her collection are the “Non-partisan” pack; there are no blue or red cards in this politically correct pack. What’s not to love about this? You can pick up this particular set for less than $10. She indicated that this is a favorite among most of her friends and one she actually allows out for a quick game.

Most of the other sets she has are special editions, many of which are sold in decorative metal containers, such as the pictured Pixar 25th Anniversary put out in 2023 set, which sells for less than $20.

 

A Lambert push plow. (Image courtesy of the author)

UNO Cards

One young lady’s UNO card collection reveals the different styles that have been released since the game was invented more than 50 years ago. (Image courtesy of the author)

UNO is a popular card game and editions are released with little, if any, fanfare. During the height of COVID, Mattel released a set titled, “Thank You, Heroes.” It could only be ordered from the Mattel website and only for a limited time with all proceeds going to first responders. Mattel has not divulged how many sets were made or sold, so buy it if you find one, because the price could be quite high — if not now, in a few years. There are also sets commemorating artists such as singer Luke Bryan. Once again, there is no information on how many sets were released or the price point.

I asked her how many different UNO sets she currently has, and she told me 25 and growing.

My advice is this, if you come across an early UNO pack or what might be a limited run, grab it. One thing the young lady I met said is that she also likes collecting the card game because they take very little room to store. You just never know, so I always err on the side that one day someone will pay good money to own one of these sets of UNO cards. Yes, I will now start looking for these.
Happy collecting.

*All prices given are for sale in a private sale, antique shop, or other resale outlets. Price is also dependent upon the geographic area in which you are selling. Auction value, selling to a dealer or pawn shop prices are about ½ or less of resale value.

Michelle Staley is a Lenexa, KS-based dealer and researcher with 35 years of experience in the antique trade.

Send questions with photos to Michelle at michelle@discovervintage.com or TXSmichelle@gmail.com. Please keep queries to one question; questions without photos of the item may not be answered. There is no guarantee that your question will be answered or published.

Michelle is also available for consulting and extensive research work beyond this column. If you would like an appraisal on an antique or collectible please go to www.michellesantiqueappraisals.com for a one-on-one appraisal. Please note new web address.

 

To appraise or not to appraise

December 2023

Michelle Knows Antiques

To appraise or not to appraise

by Michelle Staley

As I type this month’s column, the weather is very fitting for early November, chilly and raining. What better activity to undertake on a day such as this than to binge watch “Antiques Roadshow” especially when one is an antique dealer and appraiser?

My mind began to wander through my long career as an antique appraiser. I have assisted in several archaeological digs, appraised some amazing items, and even took a side trip into a forensic assessment, dating and identifying a young man whose skeleton was found in a dried-up river bed. If you have seen the movie “Dirty Dancing” there is a scene where the main characters are dancing on a log laid across a river. In reality, several years ago the river dried up and a skeleton was found. A detective from that area of Virginia reached out to me. I used the shoes to come up with the approximate year of his passing and a ring found on his finger led me to a nearby men’s university. There was initials inside the band so then I turned to yearbooks from the university and identified him using all of the information I gathered. Through my research I learned that there used to be speak-easies scattered about in the woods. The detective speculated that the young student had spent the evening drinking and while stumbling back to the university he fell into the river. I never heard from the detective again to see if he had located any family members.

My favorite archaeological dig was performed in central Caribbean Panama. I was contacted by a gentleman from the University of Texas to assist in dating, and in some cases identifying items that were found in specific areas along the Panama Canal. Some of the cultural components found dated back to the second millennium BC. They also found the first documented samples from the Caribbean slopes of Monagrillo Ware, the oldest known pottery in Lower Central America.* They also investigated the area along the canal where the workers who dug the canal lived. This was really when my experience was needed.

Hopefully, I have not lost your attention by reflecting back on these opportunities. I found the CD from the Panama Canal dig today while cleaning off a shelf in the office and felt the need to share with you.

Ten years ago, Bruce Rodgers, the former owner of Discover Vintage America, brought me onboard to write a monthly column, which I sincerely hope that y’all enjoy. Several years ago he paid for me to become a certified appraiser. When you take classes in something such as appraising you quickly learn how little you really know. I am always looking for ways to increase my knowledge, besides the education, conducting appraisals on a frequent basis is always a learning opportunity.

People get items appraised for a number of reasons. Some are simply curious about the value of things they own, appraisals for insurance purposes are popular, as are appraisals for the family once someone passes on. This hopefully prevents higher value items from being sold for a couple of dollars. Later this week I will conduct a full house appraisal for that very reason.

I certainly don’t want to talk anyone out of hiring me to conduct an appraisal but there are a few appraisal questions that are asked on a regular basis. Ashton Drake, Bradford Exchange, and Danbury Mint are all known for advertisement/order postcards inserted in magazines and they declare that their items are “Limited Edition.” Limited edition can denote several things. There are limited edition items that are actually limited to a predetermined number of pieces if you see a notation similar to 200/1000 this is telling you that you have number 200 on a run of 1000. This is the best that you can hope for. The above companies mention in tiny print that the dolls, plates, and other items they make are limited to a particular number of firing days, for instance 365 days. The great unknown is how many of a particular doll or plate the company can produce in a single day times 365 days. I can bet that they have the capability to craft several thousand items a week. Due to mass production the doll that you are paying $90 for is now worth $10 to $20. The plates and other small items created by these companies are for the most part valued at $5 or less. There are a few exceptions but they are rare.

 

A Lambert push plow. (Image courtesy of the author)

Amanda doll

Amanda doll. (Image courtesy of the author)

A Lambert push plow. (Image courtesy of the author)

Varaflame Starfire lighter by Ronson

Ronson Lighter and box. (Image courtesy of an appraisal customer)

Lighting is another question that comes up often. Some people see stained glass lamps and immediately assume that Tiffany was the manufacturer. Many of the lamps that you see today date to the 1970s by an unknown company or by homecrafters who create hanging lamps as well as tabletop lamps. Tiffany pieces are generally marked and the work is masterful. A Tiffany lamp will sell for thousands of dollars with better known pieces selling at auction for six figures. My hanging light MIGHT sell for $30 to $40 despite the fact that it has about 60 hours of labor, $200 worth of glass, and lead came in it.

Glassware took a big downturn in 2008, but the better pieces are making a strong comeback. It is often pretty easy to distinguish old from new glassware. Old glass has a bit of a greasy feel to it. Older glass such as Depression, Carnival, and pressed glass will have tiny blemishes in the glass such as bubbles, small defects that look like scratches, and will be light weight. These types of glass were made as giveaways in oatmeal, laundry soap, and dish night at the movies. They were inexpensive to make and purchase. Using the above guidelines it is relatively easy to tell the old from the new.

 

A Lambert push plow. (Image courtesy of the author)

Sainted glass light

Hanging sainted glass light. (Image courtesy of the author)

Books and Bibles can be a bit tricky. A run of the mill Bible will sell for $5 to $10, whereas one that is heavily illustrated, is a family Bible with hard covers can fetch several hundred dollars. Bibles dated pre-1800 are difficult to find but they too can sell for a tidy sum. A 1,100-year-old Codex Sassoon Hebrew Bible, which is one of the oldest surviving biblical manuscripts, sold at auction for $38.1 million, on May 17, 2023, in New York. When it comes to books, there are several factors that determine value such as condition, a first edition, original dust jacket, author, and illustrator. A signed first edition, first printing of “To Kill a Mockingbird” can sell for $30,000 to $50,000.

Then you have the flip side of the coin where items you might think have very little value can actually be worth a few dollars. Cigarette lighters and certain styles of ashtrays can be a surprise win. A Ronson Varaflame Starfire in the original box, in like new condition can sell for $50 to $80. Older office supplies can be another surprise.

I love conducting appraisals; please keep in mind that for many appraisers this is their sole means of income. I charge $25 per item and am willing to work with people who have multiple items. As much as I wish I could, it is impossible to keep up with incoming questions without payment.

Now, take your newfound mini tutorial knowledge and visit an antique store to put it in play.

Happy Holidays!

*All prices given are for sale in a private sale, antique shop, or other resale outlets. Price is also dependent upon the geographic area in which you are selling. Auction value, selling to a dealer or pawn shop prices are about ½ or less of resale value.

Michelle Staley is a Lenexa, KS-based dealer and researcher with 35 years of experience in the antique trade.

Send questions with photos to Michelle at michelle@discovervintage.com or TXSmichelle@gmail.com. Please keep queries to one question; questions without photos of the item may not be answered. There is no guarantee that your question will be answered or published.

Michelle is also available for consulting and extensive research work beyond this column. If you would like an appraisal on an antique or collectible please go to www.michellesantiqueappraisals.com for a one-on-one appraisal. Please note new web address.

 

Is the chair antique or simply a fantasy?

October 2023

Michelle Knows Antiques

Is the chair antique or simply a fantasy?

by Michelle Staley

Q:  Our family bought this chair years ago at an estate sale for Hinky Dink Kenna, a crooked alderman in Chicago. The chair dimensions are as follows: back height is 40 inches, seat height is 17 ½ inches, seat width is 21 inches, the back support is 22 inches.

A:  I would first like to give a bit of information on Hinky Dink Kenna. Since I was young I have had this strange fascination with all things mobster related, including the graft and corruption of politicians. Maybe I was a gangster moll in a previous life.

Chicago was the home base for the well-known gangster Al Capone. That is why Chicago is on my radar. In the 1890s, Hinky Dink “Michael” Kenna and Bathouse John Coughlin created a powerhouse political machine in Chicago’s first ward district “based on graft and protection money from the saloons, brothels, and gambling halls of the Levee district.” ** The Levee district was called “The Wickedest Place in the USA,” with streets named “Satan’s Mile,” and a bar named “Bucket of Blood.” This website has a couple of great maps of the Levee area, www.myalcaponemuseum.com. Hinky Dink owned a couple of saloons in the Levee district and was known to be a very smart, quiet man; those are usually the ones you need to watch out for. He passed away in 1946. Al Capone knew and worked with both of these men but was particularly fond of Hinky Dink.

Now, on to your chair. This is what I call a fantasy piece. Your accent chair is fairly contemporary — probably made in the late 1940s or 1950s, if not later. It does not depict a particular known style such as Queen Anne, George III, or other older furniture styles.
Upon close inspection, on the ends of the top rail, you can see a clear line attaching the edges of the top rail to the back uprights. This is also visible on the back. In an older piece, these attachments would be virtually invisible, and in a chair that is hand-carved, the top rail would be one continuous piece.

There are no stretcher bars attached to the legs. These are a necessity in chairs that are solid wood and heavy. The front legs are in the Queen Anne style, more or less; the claw feet are a bit overdone with three rows of “claws,” and the back legs should show a tiny outward curve, yet they are straight legs.

The carved ladies fit, more or less, into the Art Nouveau style, but the rest of the chair does not echo that period. Design Tuscano used to make and sell fantasy pieces, but a search of their furniture did not show your accent chair.

With that being said, I adore this accent chair and I’m sure that Hinky Dink did as well. Even though your chair is not a piece that you can sell and retire on the proceeds, I still put a resale value of $500 to $650 on it. This price depends on the venue through which you sell it and the area, be it rural, suburbs, or large metro city.

Just a little side note, it is not uncommon for people who conduct estate sales to bring in pieces from other estates. Also, we don’t know when the estate sale was held. Hinky Dink died in 1946, but it could have been several years before his belongings were sold. We really don’t have a clear provenance on this particular accent chair.

A Lambert push plow. (Image courtesy of the author)

Art Deco Bronze Flapper

The Art Deco Bronze Flapper Figurine by Chiparus

A Lambert push plow. (Image courtesy of the author)

Art Nouveau style chair

This chair, bought at an estate sale for the late Hinky Dink Kenna, is a fantasy piece, likely no more than 80 years old. (Images courtesy of the question submitter)

Art Nouveau and Art Deco

I want to quickly address the Art Nouveau and Art Deco periods. I get a number of questions about the difference between the two.
These two styles were the most defining movements of the 20th century. Art Nouveau is the more organic style, while Art Deco tends to be more polished.

Art Nouveau first appeared toward the latter half of the 19th century. It prevailed between 1890 and 1914. Art Nouveau, or ‘new art’ is often considered the first modern art style. Art Nouveau came at a time of industrialization, when Europe’s modern identity was defined by an industrial attitude and an ever-growing increase in mass production. It embraced and reacted against the Industrial Revolution, celebrating craftsmanship and the skill of the artist while incorporating the stylized forms of automation and industrialization. Europe was also moving away from the constraints of the Victorian period. What happened in Europe quickly made its way to America.

Art Nouveau consists of flowing lines, draws inspiration from nature, and organic designs.
When it comes to Art Deco, fun, eclectic, decadent, and luxurious come to mind. The movement grew out of the Exposition Internationales des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes that took place in 1925 in Paris. The heyday for Art Deco was the 1920s and 1930s. The Great Depression brought it crashing down.

Think of the Roaring Twenties and the movie “The Great Gatsby,” the original movie featuring Robert Redford — this was the height of the Art Deco movement. Art Deco styling is very evident in the movie; the period is well known for a luxurious style, and artisans of the time used exotic woods, geometric patterns, lots of curves, and smooth lines in their creations.
Another excellent example of the Art Deco movement is evident in the Chrysler Building in New York.

I am particularly fond of the Art Deco style. From the beautiful glass car hood ornaments, radiator caps, stylish figurines, lamps, luxurious furniture, and clothing, I am hooked. One has to be extremely careful when purchasing Art Deco items because they have been extensively reproduced which makes it easy to pay a lot of money for a reproduction but the upside is that you can get the Art Deco look without the expensive price tag. I have always wanted a Lalique glass “Spirit of the Wind” car mascot hood ornament on my vehicle. These can be had for upwards of $1,500 or a reproduction for less than $100.

The Art Deco Bronze Flapper Figurine by Chiparus sells for $900 USD. Anything created by Nancy Daum will set you back a pretty penny such as the Art Deco vase, $8,500 and the Art Nouveau vase approximately $10,000.

Do you have a design period that you would love to learn more about? Please email me and let me know what your interest is.

*gallerease.com/en/magazine/articles
**www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org

*All prices given are for sale in a private sale, antique shop, or other resale outlets. Price is also dependent upon the geographic area in which you are selling. Auction value, selling to a dealer or pawn shop prices are about ½ or less of resale value.

Michelle Staley is a Lenexa, KS-based dealer and researcher with 35 years of experience in the antique trade.

Send questions with photos to Michelle at michelle@discovervintage.com or TXSmichelle@gmail.com. Please keep queries to one question; questions without photos of the item may not be answered. There is no guarantee that your question will be answered or published.

Michelle is also available for consulting and extensive research work beyond this column. If you would like an appraisal on an antique or collectible please go to www.michellesantiqueappraisals.com for a one-on-one appraisal. Please note new web address.